Sunday, September 6, 2009

Exploring the Kancamagus Hwy., NH

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

After speaking to friends Mark & Debbie Ford who volunteer for the US Park Service and spent the summer here last year, we are anxious to drive the Kancamagus Highway and visit the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

Our first stop of interest is the Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead. This beautiful post and beam building catches our eye, and we can't help but to pull over and check this out.

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

The homesteaders cut trees for firewood and building materials, vastly changing the landscape.

The Russell-Colbath provides a sense of struggle for survival. Homesteads in this era consisted of a rustic dwelling, small garden and a barn for livestock.

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

In 1961 the property was purchased by the US Forest Service and the house has been restored to much of its original setting. The barn was completed in 2003 and can be rented in the summer for family gatherings, wedding receptions and community events.

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

Logging was the main source of income, and the Swift River played an important role. The river, shown below, is a short walk from the homestead. Additionally, small scale railroads were constructed to facilitate logging operations. In the early 1900's, the Swift River Railroad had about 20 miles of rail line in the valley.

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

The interprative spokeswoman, Carol Felice, spends considerable time with Bob (I'm busy with picture taking,) explaining the hardships endured by these settlers and women in particular. She has Bob captivated! Note the hint of color in the tree. Fall is nearing.

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

From Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

After our long drive, we're famished. Now in North Conway, we make a drive down the main street and notice one restaurant which is jammed - the Muddy Moose. And speaking of Moose, where are they? We see many Brake for Moose signs, but never while I have my camera up front in the car - rats! Also, I notice many signs referring to zip lining. What's that all about?

For further information: The Historic Russell-Colbath Homestead

1 comment:

Eva Gallant said...

Zip Lining is when they put you in a harness and you go down the mountainside hanging from a cable. Not an activity for anyone with a fear of heights!